Idioms and Phrases December Series: Learn a new idiom daily.

If improving English is one of your resolutions for 2019, you are in the right place. Bookmark our site www.addicted2learn.com to read and learn Idioms and Phrases every day. In the Idioms and Phrases, the December series learn a new collection of Idioms that are updated every day.

Idioms and Phrases December Series: December 31:

Beyond wildest dreams:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe something that is better than imagination.

Example Sentence: I have found my job fascinating and fulfilling. It’s beyond my wildest dreams.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Beyond wildest dreams:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Beyond wildest dreams:

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And that’s a wrap for 2019. We hope you had an amazing learning experience at addicted2learn. We wish you all a very happy New Year 2020. Keep Learning. Happy 2020!

Looking for January 2020 Series? Here’s the link: Idioms and Phrases January series


December 30:

A chunk of change:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe something that involves a huge amount of money.

Example Sentence: Peter’s new sports car costs a real big chunk of change.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  A chunk of change.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: A chunk of change.

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December 29:

Neck and neck:

Meaning: Used to describe competitors who are extremely close to each other in a competition or race.

Example Sentence: Sam and Peters have been neck and neck for this entire race.

Idiom of the day: Neck and neck.
Idiom of the day: Neck and neck.

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December 28:

Set the wheels in motion:

Meaning: Initiate something so as to achieve goals or objectives.

Example Sentence: John’s contribution to the project will surely set the wheels in motion.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Set the wheels in the motion.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Set the wheels in the motion.

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December 27:

Say your piece:

Meaning: Share one’s opinions or views.

Example Sentence: Stop annoying us. Say your piece and get back to work.

Idiom of the day: Say your piece.
Idiom of the day: Say your piece.

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December 26:

Be a shining example:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe something as an excellent or ideal example.

Example Sentence: Pattrick and Pamela are a shining example of a perfect happily married couple.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Be a shining example
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Be a shining example

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December 25:

An admirable Crichton.

Meaning: Used to describe a person who excels in one or more disciplines and who has supreme competence.

Example Sentence: Sam had studied the demand in the market and launched the product in accordance. He is surely an admirable Crichton.

Idiom of the day: an admirable Crichton.
Idiom of the day: an admirable Crichton.

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December 24:

A mile a minute:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe something that is done very quickly; fast, quick etc.

Example Sentence: I couldn’t keep track of everything he was saying. He talks at a mile a minute.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  A mile a minute:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: A mile a minute:

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December 23:

Be chuffed to bits:

Meaning: Used in a context when someone is pleased and happy with something.

Example Sentence: Archie was chuffed to bits after her name was announced as the best student of the college.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Be chuffed to bits:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Be chuffed to bits:

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December 22.

Pack a wallop:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe something which is powerful, exciting, and energetic.

Example Sentence: Unlike her last album, her new release packs a wallop.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Pack a wallop:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Pack a wallop:

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December 21:

A whole new ball game:

Meaning: Used to describe a significant change in circumstances or events.

Example Sentence: After the newly appointed coach joined the team it is a whole new ball game.

Idiom of the day: A whole new ball game:
Idiom of the day: A whole new ball game:

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December 20:

Bright Spark:

Meaning: Used to describe a person who is clever and intelligent in the group.

Example Sentence: Since Kelvin answered the question correctly, the teacher complimented him as the bright spark in the classroom.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Bright Spark.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Bright Spark.

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December 19:

Dark Horse:

Meaning: A person who has greater abilities than he actually shows; Someone whose abilities are unknown but who could unexpectedly win or achieve success.

Example Sentence: No one knew about Ken earlier, but suddenly he is being seen as the dark horse with his amazing display of performance.

Idiom of the day: Dark Horse.
Idiom of the day: Dark Horse.

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December 18:

Bide your time:

Meaning: If you bide your time, you wait for a good opportunity to do something.

Example Sentence: John is considering to make investments in stocks, but he is just biding his time, waiting for the prices to drop.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Bide your time.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Bide your time.

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December 17:

Build Bridges:

Meaning: Used in a context when a person tries to remove the differences between the two opposing groups.

Example Sentence: A mediator is appointed to build bridges between the management and the trade union.

Idiom of the day: Build Bridges.
Idiom of the day: Build Bridges.

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December 16:

Call someone names:

Meaning: Used in a context when someone is insulted with unpleasant and rude comments.

Example Sentence: A lot of people called him names but I am pretty sure that he is an honest person.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Call someone names:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Call someone names:

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December 15:

Call something into question:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe something which is doubtful and uncertain.

Example Sentence: Sam’s dedication and honesty towards his work have never been called into question.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Call something into question:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Call something into question:

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December 14:

Spread oneself too thin:

Meaning: Used in a context when someone gets involved in too many activities and tasks at the same time.

Example Sentence: I realized I have been spreading myself too thin So I have decided to resign from the post of secretary for the Golf club.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Spread oneself too thin.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Spread oneself too thin.

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December 13:

Shoot the Breeze:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe an informal chat; to have a casual conversation.

Example Sentence: Since the Manager was on a vacation, the employees have been shooting the breeze throughout the entire day.

Idioms and Phrases December Series: Shoot the Breeze.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Shoot the Breeze.

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December 12:

Pull out all the stops:

Meaning: Used when someone does everything possible to make it successful; take every possible step to make something a success.

Example Sentence: Adam and Samantha pulled out all the stops to make sure that the guests enjoy their wedding.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Pull out all the stops.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Pull out all the stops.

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December 11:

Keep nose to the grindstone:

Meaning: Used to describe determination and dedication to achieve something.

Example Sentence: Sandra was so determined to become a doctor that she kept her nose to the grindstone entire year.

  Idioms and Phrases December Series: Keep nose to the grindstone.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Keep nose to the grindstone.

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December 10:

Go over big with somebody:

Meaning: Used in a context when someone makes a good impression on somebody; to be successful or impressive.

Example Sentence: Samantha has shared a recipe for healthy cookies that always goes over big with kids.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Go over big with somebody:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Go over big with somebody:

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December 9:

Be too big for your boots:

Meaning: Used in a context when someone tries to act as if he is important and influential than he actually is.

Example Sentence: Sam has been getting a bit too big for his boots ever since he got a promotion.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Be too big for your boots
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Be too big for your boots

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December 8:

Not break the bank:

Meaning: Usually a humorous way of telling that something would not cost much; Something which is affordable.

Example Sentence: Come on! One evening at the pub won’t break the bank.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Not break the bank.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Not break the bank.

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December 7:

Bandy Words:

Meaning: Used in a context when someone gets into an argument or speaks in a rude manner.

Example Sentence: Samantha refused to forgive sam because he frequently gets into bandy words with her.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series: Bandy Words.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Bandy Words.

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December 6:

Swallow your pride:

Meaning: If you swallow your pride, you do something even though it hurts your self-respect and feelings.

Example Sentence: I swallowed my pride to do menial jobs for a few months till I found a better job.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Swallow your pride:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Swallow your pride:

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December 5:

Class Clown:

Meaning: A student who is funny and makes other students laugh in the class.

Example Sentence: Even today most of my classmates remember me as the class clown.

Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Class Clown:
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Class Clown:

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December 4:

Be as easy as a pie:

Meaning: Used to describe a task or activity that is easy to achieve.

Example Sentence: After so many years as a marketing consultant, finalizing business deals with clients is as easy as a pie.

Idioms and Phrases December Series: Be as easy as a pie.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Be as easy as a pie.

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December 3:

Not one’s Cup of tea:

Meaning: Used to describe something that you don’t like or you are not interested in.

Example Sentence: I decided not to go to the restaurant with them because eating spicy food is not my cup of tea.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Not one's Cup of tea
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Not one’s Cup of tea

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December 2:

Have a whale of a time:

Meaning: Used in a context to describe someone who is enjoying himself and having the best time

Example Sentence: Everyone of us had a whale of a time last weekend at Amanda’s birthday party.

 Idioms and Phrases December Series:  Have a whale of a time.
Idioms and Phrases December Series: Have a whale of a time.

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December 1:

A Piece of cake:

Meaning: Something that is easy to achieve; an easy task.

Example Sentence: I initially thought learning English was a difficult task, but learning and practicing for a few minutes every day, it turned out to be a piece of cake.

Idiom of the day - A piece of cake.
Idiom of the day – A piece of cake.

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Looking for more? Visit our: Learn Idioms daily to learn idioms.
Other Suggested Readings:  Word of the day December Series: Learn a new word every day

In the first place, We would like to thank our readers for showing us their commendable support. We have received emails from our lovely readers stating that they enjoyed learning new words every day. Some of them even stated that they started implementing it in their daily routine. For this reason, we have decided to start the same series for this month.

Some Tips to improve vocabulary:

  1. Learn new words every day so that you can increase your word power.
  2. Learning new words will not be sufficient, try to include those words in your daily conversations.
  3. Besides learning new words, Keep discussing those words from time to time. Furthermore, Discuss them with someone who is interested in vocabulary.
  4. Carry a dictionary. Wait, that doesn’t mean that you carry a huge bulky dictionary, You have many apps available on both android and ios platforms. Download them.
  5. Understand the root words. This will make your job easier.
  6. Another key point is to use flashcards to memorize new words.
  7. Read frequently.
  8. Make a note of word that you don’t know accordingly and refer that in a dictionary.
  9.  In addition to the above, you can visit us and bookmark our site: www.addicted2learn.com to learn a new word every day.
  10. Furthermore, you can also find many apps that notify you of a new word every day.

In case you enjoyed reading this post, do share it. Because everyone deserves to learn.

We would like to thank our readers once again for showing us so much love. It is all because of your support that we always give our best to bring out the best content for all of you.

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